The river of information about Sarah Palin continues to trickle out to Americans.

Alaska governor and McCain runningmate Sarah Palin was a convention-going member of the Alaska Independence Party (AIP), a political organization dedicated to the following propositions (thanks to georgia10’s diary at Daily Kos):

  • A belief that “the vote for statehood was invalid because the people were not presented with the range of options available to them” and that “the federal government has since breached the contract for statehood on numerous occasions in over a dozen serious and substantial instances.”
  • A belief that there should be a vote on Alaskan secession.
  • Remaining “steadfastly opposed to environmental regulations and actively promotes the private ownership and widespread development of Alaskan land.”
  • A platform which includes:

    [A]mending the Constitution of the State of Alaska so as to re-establish the rights of all Alaskan residents to entry upon all public lands within the state, and to acquire private property interest there in, under fair and reasonable conditions. Such property interest shall include surface and sub-surface patent.

    [F]oster a constitutional amendment abolishing and prohibiting all property taxes.

  • [S]eek[ing] the complete repatriation of the public lands, held by the federal government, to the state and people of Alaska[.]

This is all confirmed by ABC News.

Officials of the Alaskan Independence Party say that Palin was once so independent, she was once a member of their party, which since the 1970s has been pushing for a legal vote for Alaskans to decide whether or not residents of the 49th state can secede from the United States.

And while McCain’s motto — as seen in a new TV ad — is “Country First,” the AIP’s motto is the exact opposite — “Alaska First — Alaska Always.”

Now, yes, people can change their minds.  And perhaps Palin did.

But this continues a disturbing pattern.  For instance, she also changed her mind about the “Bridge to Nowhere,” a bridge-building project funded by the Congress.

During her first speech after being named as McCain’s surprise pick as a running mate, Palin said she had told Congress “‘thanks but no thanks’ on that bridge to nowhere.”

In the city Ketchikan, the planned site of the so-called “Bridge to Nowhere,” political leaders of both parties said the claim was false and a betrayal of their community, because she had supported the bridge and the earmark for it secured by Alaska’s Congressional delegation during her run for governor.

The bridge, a span from the city to Gravina Island, home to only a few dozen people, secured a $223 million earmark in 2005. The pricey designation raised a furor and critics, including McCain, used the bridge as an example of wasteful federal spending on politicians’ pet projects.

What else is going to come out about Palin?  And how does this possibly help McCain’s message of “Country first,” when she stood for changing the composition of the country?  That didn’t throw him off?

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